Budapest Nanny – What to Pay Babysitters

by Barbara Petri on February 23, 2012

Finding the right person to fit in with your family and take care of your kids is not easy. Finding a long-term babysitter may be even more difficult, because you have to be patient with them in the first few weeks and give them time to get used to your routines and needs. Offering them a proper salary will help this process along a great deal! In this post I will cover babysitter and nanny pay rates, holidays and termination.

If you are only hiring a babysitter to come by a couple times a week for a few hours, then a contract is not really necessary. You pay an hourly rate, and usually pay in cash at the end of each babysitting session, but this depends on what you agree with the babysitter. In this case, you will not need to worry about paying the babysitter on public holidays, overtime, or when you go on vacation. The going hourly rate for English-speaking babysitters is between 1,200 and 2,000 HUF. For both babysitters and nannies it is generally understood that if they work past 9 pm, the cost of the taxi home will be covered by the employer.

If you are planning on hiring a nanny full time (40-45 hours a week) or a live-in nanny, then a contract is necessary and you will have to work out payment terms for public holidays and family vacations. In most cases nannies are paid by the hour, but this should also be something you discuss specifically with the nanny if you’d like to pay a monthly rate. The hourly pay for English-speaking nannies is the same as for occasional babysitters, between 1,200 to 2,000 HUF per hour (5 to 10 USD). This can include light housekeeping and grocery shopping, which should be clarified in the contract as well. On a monthly basis this means paying anywhere between 240,000 to 280,000 HUF.

Usually sitters work according to the family’s yearly schedule, meaning that they are available to work on Hungarian national holidays as well if the parent’s working schedule is not based on the Hungarian calendar. According to Hungarian state laws, employees must be paid one-and-a-half times their regular pay if they work overtime and double their regular pay if working weekends.

Another important detail that you have to discuss is payment during the Summer or during family holidays. You have to decide how much the nanny’s pay will be if you go abroad without them (usually it’s half their salary) and what the rate will be if the nanny goes with you. If you take the nanny with you on holiday, usually they receive their normal pay rate, plus you must cover their cost for travel, room and board.

Lastly, if you have a full-time nanny on contract, the termination period is also important. Generally both sides should give minimum one, maximum two months notice. It is very important that this also appears on the contract. The contract doesn’t have to be very official, even an email printed out or a handwritten agreement works, just make sure it is signed by both of you.

The next post will cover tips on how to introduce a nanny or babysitter into your daily routines and how to plan your first few days together.

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I`ve been a nanny in Budapest working for foreign families since 2006. I have met people from many different backgrounds, babysat for kids of all ages and have experienced a lot about what it means to become part of a family, and having the patience to handle not only many different types of children, but their parents too. Since 2011 I`m a blessed mom of a precious little boy, and have come to know firsthand `the other side of the coin` (to directly translate an expression from Hungarian). Now I`m back to work part time with my son tagging along. I`m happy to answer any nanny- or baby-related questions. I’m also happy to help moms find cleaning services, drivers, gardeners or any other help around the house.

 

{ 10 comments… read them below or add one }

Andi February 29, 2012 at 11:14 am

Great post Barbi! Just a few questions I had in mind. Is there an official association that gathers nannies together and helps them with any issues they might have?

As a parent how can you make sure that the person you employ is trustworthy, is this regulated at all in Hungary?
In the UK, the parents are treated as the employers of the nanny so as an employer parents must calculate and pay all tax and NI on the nanny’s behalf;The parent must adhere to statutory employment rights (e.g. provide paid leave, redundancy pay, meet employer’s health and safety obligations in the workplace, obtain employer’s insurance etc and If your nanny gets pregnant while working for you, she will be entitled to maternity leave!)

you mention the contract doesn’t have to be very official – does this mean this is pretty much off the books, no tax paid so just cash in hand? what happens if there are any disputes? if it’s not a very official contract how can both parties make sure that what’s in the contract will be met?

Reply

Barbi Dallos March 2, 2012 at 12:51 pm

Doing house work is a special legal status of employment. Its detailed regulations can be found in Act XC of 2010.
It is special, because the employer provides an income earned by work to another private individual from their income which has already been taxed. In order that after an income like that there would be no more taxes to be paid, the law introduces the notion of employment outside of the tax system. This kind of employment includes the employment between natural persons with the aim of house work. The wage of the house work given to the the household employee by the employer is the so called income outside the tax system. According to the law, no written agreement is compulsory for such an employment, but it is possible.

The employer has to report this kind of employment before it starts to the National Tax Office, and has to report it every month when there is work done. They can report through the ügyfélkapu (publicly avaliable goverment offices or help desks) or through the phone client service. The employer has to pay a registration fee of 1000 HUF per month per employee. This sum is independent of the number of days of work done in a month.

The employer doesn’t have to pay any insurance after the nanny, it’s something that she has to arrange for herself. Providing paid leave, redundancy pay, or maternity leave has to be defined individually between the family and the nanny.

Reply

Andi May 9, 2012 at 9:49 am

Wow. Does the law actually includes ‘being a babysitter’ as housework (cleaning) I obviously need to change profession if you can earn 240,000 to 280,000 HUF a month tax free… sorry but that just sounds way off…

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Barbi Dallos May 9, 2012 at 3:25 pm

Yes, according to the law number XV. from 2010. it calles this kind of work “háztartási munka” (House keeping), and “gyermekfelügyelet” (child care) is included. It also includes cleaning, cooking, laundry, ironing, teaching at home, gardening and general house keeping. You can find more information (in Hungarian) here: http://www.adoklub.eu/ado-klub/adoklub-mindenkinek/adoszakerto/haztartasi-alkalmazott/

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janinka November 29, 2012 at 6:44 pm

Hello I would like to ask if it is difficult to find a nanny job in Budapest. I am thinking maybe relocating to Budapest in 2 years time, so was wondering if you think there is good possibility to find a nanny job. I am UK qualified nursery nurse and have done a lot of nanny housekeeping jobs in the UK. at the moment i am nanny in France . Thank you for your reply .
J.

Reply

trisna January 11, 2013 at 2:04 am

Thank you for the information.

My family are planning to stay at Budapest for 3 years, and we’re planning to bring our nanny. Is there any regulation regarding foreign workers especially asian as a nanny.

Reply

Brigitta January 11, 2013 at 11:28 am

Dear Parents,

I am a 29 years old, calm, flexible, reliable fun and bubbly person with more than 7 years of experiance in childcare in UK and NL. I am Hungarian and currently living in Amsterdam but planning to move back to Hungary soon. If you are interested in me to look after your little one/s please feel free to contact me via e-mail: brigi_david@hotmail.com

Thanks along.

Your Sincerely,
Brigitta

Reply

Klaudia March 15, 2013 at 8:27 pm

Dear Families,

I am a 26 years old caring, patient, child loving young woman with nearly 5 years of childcare experience in the UK and in the US (New York and Hawaii) as well. All of the families I worked for had infants (as young as 3 month) and toddlers or school aged children as well.
If you are interested please contact me at the following e-mal address:
qurgyi@freemail.hu or klaudia.kurgyis@gmail.com

Best regards,

Klaudia

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Judith February 9, 2014 at 12:45 am

Hi, I had offers to baby sit, to be honest I have no experience with stranger i only had to baby sit kids and babies that are family, I have one question for you what kind of activities the babysitter has to do practice with the child (besides reading, playing), or we just have to look after them keep them safe until their parents come home ?

Reply

Ildiko February 27, 2014 at 12:14 pm

Hi, I read this post and liked your thorough explanation. I am a Hungarian mom with three children (8, 6, 4). We were living in the US for three years and now moving back to Hungary. All our kids are fluent in English and I would like to hire a nanny who would be able to help keeping their knowledge alive in Hungarian environment. So I would prefer somebody who is native English. What is your suggestion where to look for this kind of help?

Reply

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